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10 Posts authored by: daniperea

Do people say your head is in the clouds? If they do, you’re likely on to something. At least if your head is in charge of your healthcare practice’s technology. Because you’ll be on the cutting edge of adopting this new technology. Check out 3 ways cloud technology is a gamechanger for health services providers.

 

 

1) Administrative costs.

 

20 percent of consumers have unpaid medical bills due to confusing billing processes.

 

No surprise here: inefficient billing practices are revenue drainers. Nearly 20 percent of consumers have unpaid health care bills due to confusing payment processes. And, up to 80 percent of medical bills contain mistakes, which results in a loss of approximately $125 billion annually.

 

up to 80% of medical bills contain errors.

 

Meanwhile, healthcare providers operating in the cloud are enjoying $8 billion in annual savings. Check out how digital payments reduced one provider’s administrative costs by 25 percent, and reduced time spent on submitting claims and processing patient payments by 88 percent.

 

2) Patient service.

Patients expect 24/7 availability from health service providers. Can your patient portal keep up?

Patients are accustomed to 24/7 availability and service from their banks, their retailers, their dog groomers –you get the picture. They’d like the same level of access and service from their healthcare providers.

 

In this new digital landscape, healthcare providers need to deliver Internet-based services that connect healthcare professionals with patients, to talk about upcoming procedures, aftercare, and medication management. Providers are increasingly turning to cloud solutions to modernize their legacy apps and IT infrastructure to make this happen.

 

3) Scalability and efficiency.

Getting up and running is half the battle and again, cloud technology claims the edge here. Cloud deployments typically take only 3-6 months, compared to the 12-month timeframe to implement an on-premise solution.

 health care cloud spending is expected to reach $9 billion

Healthcare cloud spending is skyrocketing, expected to increase from $3.73 billion in 2015, to $9.48 billion in 2020. And companies that offer the solutions health services providers are seeking will undoubtedly reap the financial benefits. Will yours be one of them?

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We want Vantiv O.N.E. to be the best community it can be, and we'd love your input. How have we been doing?

 

Let us know how we can make Vantiv O.N.E. better - whether that's the user experience, our documentation, or resources you wish we offered.

 

Everyone who submits an idea will get a $10 Starbucks card to help them power through the rest of the year. All entries will be entered into a contest for a $100 Amazon card. (Check out our terms and conditions here.) 

 

Contest ended Jan 2017

Kevin Eksterowicz is a Talent Acquisition Leader at Vantiv. I asked him about the new hiring approach that Vantiv rolled out this year (and that my team has used to great success). Here's what he had to say:

 

One of the most impactful exercises a company executes is its selection of new employees.  And when you’re growing as rapidly as Vantiv, the stakes are especially high.  In 2016 alone, we filled almost 1,400 jobs! 

 

However, when we scanned the organization late last year, a few things stuck out like a sore thumb:

  • Our interview and selection process lacked consistency and structure.
  • Interview training and tools were not on any of our curriculum.
  • Feedback on candidate experience was often lackluster at best.
  • Turnover within the first 12 months of hire was 23%, 75% of which took place within the first six months. 

 

We stopped in our tracks and realized that we had a huge opportunity in front of us to deliver value and impact to this growing organization.

 

After months of planning, developing and piloting, we launched Vantiv’s SELECT! program on July 31st. SELECT! is an approach to interviewing and selection that embraces a set structure and strategy for all roles in the organization, ideally with just one on-site visit limited to four interview sessions.  These sessions are tied directly to Vantiv’s leadership model and evaluate a candidate not just on experience and job titles, but through deep focus on the competencies required for success. 

 

We call these sessions our interview focus areas: 

 

  • Role Fit
  • Business Impact
  • Leadership/Self-Leadership
  • Culture & Values. 

 

Focus areas remain consistent across all levels of the organization, yet the competencies and suggested interview questions vary by level.  The outcome is a well-rounded candidate evaluation and a candidate experience that feels robust, streamlined and smooth. 

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Our Talent Management and Talent Acquisition teams worked hand-in-hand to develop this program complete with:

  • Interactive, online, level-based interview guides with recommended behavior-based interview questions
  • An interactive feedback mechanism to capture candidate-specific scores and notes for each focus area
  • Mandatory comprehensive eLearning courses:  one for people leaders, one for individual contributor interview panelists
  • Half-day classroom training
  • People Leader and Interviewer job aids
  • An Interview Checklist
  • Custom approaches for nuanced groups:  sales (remote), executive, front-line operations

 

Just three months in, almost every people leader (740+) and over 300 interviewers have completed the eLearning. New hire Michael Rose was one of the first candidates to go through the new hiring process. He said, "As I interviewed with potential new employers, Vantiv’s interview process stood out above the pack. Vantiv sent a clear message to me during the interview process… a well-organized and focused approach to finding the best candidate while providing an excellent candidate experience for me. The detailed/thoughtful interview process was a large factor for me choosing Vantiv!  Even the follow-up call from my new Leader after I had accepted the offer reassured me I had definitely made the right choice.”

 

Early feedback on the SELECT! process is very positive and by this time next year, we target marked improvement in early attrition, candidate experience feedback, time to fill metrics and hiring manager satisfaction feedback. Hiring Manager Shannon Reichart said of SELECT!, “this team approach has not only helped me as a hiring manager to make an informed decision regarding new hires, but I believe that it is creating a positive experience for our candidates, providing them with greater insights into Vantiv from other perspectives. Select will give us the foundation that we need as a leadership team to recruit, develop, and retain great people here at Vantiv!”

daniperea

3 Blogs Coders Love

Posted by daniperea Oct 5, 2017

If you're looking to level up in your developer knowledge or to commiserate with other coders, we recommend giving one of these blogs a read. Do you have a favorite coder blog? Let us know in the comments!

 

1) CSS-Tricks

CSS-Tricks is a blog on all things web design and development, and true to their roots, it also provides many helpful tips and tricks on Cascading Style Sheets. It's run and written by Chris Coyier and a merry team of CSS enthusiasts.  I love it because of its readability, the sense of play in every post and because of the copious walkthroughs with code examples.  Plus it's so frequently updated, there's often new content a few times a day.

Favorite Post: Turning Text into a Tweetstorm

 

2) Women Who Code

Women who Code is a nonprofit with over 100,000 members who are tech professionals. You don't have to be a member to access their awesome blog, which is full of profiles of women developers and organizations advancing opportunities for women in tech; hackathon invites and meet-ups; career tips from advocating for your rights at work to becoming a better public speaker; conference recaps; and of course, coding advice. Their team of writers is fantastic and this might be one of the few places on the internet where reading the comments is a worthwhile endeavor. Come for the content, stay for the community.

Favorite Post: Protecting Your Rights at Work (this is actually a series: here's part 1 and part 3.)

 

3) Coding Horror

Coding Horror is both extremely hilarious and highly informative look at both code and coders.  The half-personal/half tech blog is written by Stack Overflow co-founder Jeff Atwood. With 13 years of posts accumulated on the blog, you'll find everything from well-researched and pithy posts on programming, to tips for both newbies and experts, to personal musings. One downside: Jeff is so busy, that months can go by without an update.

Favorite Post:  Password Rules are [Horse Puckey]

 

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Kevin Eksterowicz is a Talent Acquisition Leader here at Vantiv. I asked him what he loves about his job, and what advice he has for college students and recent graduates entering the job market.

 

How did you get into HR?

Like a lot of people, I actually sort of “fell” into HR. I majored in Marketing in college and I had my heart set on working for a huge NYC ad agency. The first opportunity they could offer me was as a Recruiting Coordinator serving the creative department and I jumped at the chance. A year later, I got the opportunity to work in a true advertising role. Sure enough, after a few years in an ad exec role, I realized that I missed HR and actively sought to return to Recruiting.

 

What do you love about your job?

What’s especially nice about the world of Talent Acquisition is that you’re helping people and you get the gratification of feeling needed. You have hiring managers with teams who are feeling the pain of a vacant position and you’ve got candidates who are actively seeking to make a change. You get to ease the pain of the internal client while helping someone gain the opportunity to take their career to the next level. It’s a win-win! The icing on the cake: you get to build relationships every day and no two days are the same.

 

What's the best job-seeking advice for college students or recent graduates you've heard?

It probably sounds like common sense but, “do your homework on the companies you’re applying to,” is easy, low-hanging fruit with big impact. If I call a candidate and they can’t remember the role they’ve applied to or what the company does, it’s a huge strike against you. Apply to roles and companies that really intrigue you and that you would be excited to interview for. A recruiter and a hiring manager can usually see right through a superficial interest level. I’d add that with the world of social media, it’s vital that things like your Facebook page and LinkedIn profile only paint you in a positive, mature, responsible light.

 

What's the worst job-seeking advice for college students or recent graduates you've heard?

“Cast a wide net by applying to lots of jobs that look exciting to you at a company.” 

As a recruiter, if I see a candidate who had applied to a wide variety of jobs, I’m likely to perceive them as unfocused and possibly desperate – just eager to get a foot in the door but not invested in something specific and therefore more likely to leave the role/company early.

 

Do you have any tips for college students or recent grads on making their resume stand out?

Yes! So many tips, but I’ll focus on the big ones.

  • Tweak your resume so that you highlight your skills and experiences that relate well to what the employer is looking for as stated in the job description. Don’t assume that they’ll just connect the dots – help them get there and make those highlights your leading bullet points under a specific job or internship.
  • There’s really no reason for your resume to be more than 1 page unless you’re coming from a graduate program and are already deep into your career. That said, limit your bullet points to the most important contributions you’ve made.
  • Quantify wherever you can! Example: “Increased customer service scores by 28% as a result of…”
  • Skip the objective section that so many people include at the top of their resume. The objective is to land the job you’ve just applied for and we already know that.
  • Have a second set of eyes review your resume. Typos can be deadly as first impressions go!
  • Do you have any tips for college students or recent grads on making the most of an internship?
  • Perform as if your entire internship is an interview because that’s really what it is. Come to work every day as if you’re fighting the competition to keep your foot in the door with the company. 

 

 

Want to know when Vantiv will be recruiting at your college or university? Click here for a list of our upcoming career fairs.

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Audrey Inniger is a campaign recruiting program specialist here at Vantiv. As college career fair season is about to kick off, I asked her what she loves about her job, and what advice she has for college students approaching recruiting tables at their college's job fair.

 

What’s your favorite thing about your job?

I love the variety; truly no day is the same! I experience the most variation in regards to the different groups with which I work. From current students to University career services to the business functions I support, there is a wide range of partners I encounter on a daily basis, who I am always learning from.

 

Also, I love the opportunity for growth throughout campus recruiting initiatives at Vantiv. As our campus recruiting programs are fairly young when compared to other organizations, this leaves room to experiment with new ideas in order to attract talent.

 

I know, I know – This is two favorites, but there is a lot to like about my role!

 

How did you get into HR?

Funny enough, I started my college career at Miami University (Go Redhawks!) believing I wanted to be a Speech Pathologist. After realizing the years of school required and the amount of tuition debt I’d accumulate, I stumbled upon an internship within Human Resources, as a Generalist. After my internship, I changed my major to Business Management & Leadership, with a focus in Human Resources. As I had several mentors from my first internship through Miami University, my mentors advised me to begin my Human Resources career within Talent Acquisition. I took their advice and began my fulltime career hiring in-house talent for a small PR and Marketing software company. Through this position, I was asked to build a campus recruiting program, which I enjoyed immensely.  In February 2016, I joined Vantiv and the rest is history!

 

What are some tips for college students or recent graduates looking to stand out at a job fair?

Showcase what makes you, YOU. The best and most memorable conversations I have are those in which the student talks about their passions, interests, and quirks. Enjoy skydiving? Have a passion for cooking international fare? Rap music enthusiast? Tell me about it! Highlighting those characteristics will make you most memorable at the career fair and will spark a more natural relaxed conversation.

 

Do you have any advice for college students or recent graduates on acing their first interview?

Do your homework, which includes homework on the company, on the people you are interviewing with, on the city where the role is located. LinkedIn should be your best friend!

 

Once you’ve done your homework, prepare thoughtful questions to ask the recruiter or hiring manager in which you are interviewing.

 

Can you do a little “myth-busting” on any career advice you’ve heard dispensed that is flat-out wrong?

“Accept the highest paying job offer.”

 

Money doesn’t buy happiness. Although salary is one factor to consider, also consider the company culture, your team (especially your direct manager), as well as career advancement opportunities.

 

Want to know when Vantiv will be recruiting at your college or university? Click here for a list of our upcoming career fairs.

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Lena Rutherford, intern extraordinaire, is a student at Miami University. This summer she interned at Vantiv's Denver office. I chatted with Lena about her internship here and what her plans are for her (bright!) future:

 

What are you studying in school, and what do you hope to do for your career?

I am majoring in Business Analytics and minoring in Arts Entrepreneurship. I love this combination because I am very balanced between my left and right brain. I hope this combination will give me the tools to measure ambiguous things through applying data analytics to value creation in the arts.

 

I want to have several careers, beginning with data analytics (perhaps in the technology consulting field), building into more strategic and creative roles that are infused with data, pivoting into starting my own company (or companies), and ending in venture capital. I hope that the skill sets I continue to develop in data analysis and business strategy will propel me to diverse roles and companies throughout the technology industry and the world.

 

What have you learned during your internship?

Coming from a startup last summer, Vantiv has taught me how corporations function and has given me a new appreciation for how standardization aligns diverse products and people. I have learned about the industry through PI planning, product meetings, and projects.

 

Creating a competitive analysis matrix for PayFac and researching industry verticals and horizontals for a strategy presentation deepened my industry knowledge through hands-on experience. More closely related to my major, I have learned about financial data through conducting a historical analysis of IP equipment data and by reconstructing financial models.

 

My internship has taught me as much about myself as it has about the business world – how I work best, how I form business relationships, and how to achieve work/life balance (despite a 45-minute commute). These are only a few things that I have learned, but there are many more things that I am grateful to my coworkers and this opportunity for teaching me.

 

What will you take with you from Vantiv?

Of course, I will take this experience and the professional relationships I've made with me. The subtle, everyday things I have done here have accumulated into this nebulous term, “experience.” I am thankful for what a rich and positive experience it has been and for how I will be able to build off of my experience wherever my career takes me next.

 

I have also formed great relationships with my coworkers and want to continue these relationships after my internship ends. I have greatly enjoyed getting to know the abundance of friendly people here at Vantiv and will miss seeing everyone daily.

 

We'll miss seeing Lena around the office, but we wish her all the best for this school year and beyond.

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Want to intern at Vantiv or just learn more about us? Vantiv will be at recruiting events at several colleges and universities this fall, including Miami University (so we can say hi to Lena). Come see us.

It's Vantiv ONE's birthday! We're celebrating with five days of fun for the TechTribe, including contests, a Twitter takeover, a webinar with our buddies at Microsoft, and more.

Check out what mcafiero and I are looking forward to this week:

 

If you're looking to level up in your developer knowledge during your commute, or have a road trip coming up and want to binge listen to something new, we recommend giving one of these podcasts a try. Do you have a favorite coder cast? Let us know in the comments!

 

The podcast that's like a happy hour with your smartest coworkers:

Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour is a five-star rated panel-style podcast that features software engineers from Netflix, Evrnote, Atlassian and LinkedIn talking over drinks about all things Front End Development, from starting a new job to style guide best practices.

 

For great stories from coders:

CodeNewbie

The CodeNewbie podcast is for (as the title says) coding n00bs. Host Saron Yitbarek interviews a different guest each week, and they discuss their coding journey, how they got their first coding gif, and more. We really liked the recent episode "Mental Health talks from Michelle Morales and Greg Baugues". Michelle, a researcher and web developer at the Futures Initiative, talked about using open source tools to better diagnoze depression, and Greg, the Manager of Twilio's Developer Community shared his personal struggles with ADHD and bipolar disorder.

 

For great interviews:

Away From the Keyboard

Away from the Keyboard is a five-star rated podcast that talks to technology experts and tells their stories of how they started, how they grew, how they learned, and how they unwind. It’s hosted by two software developers: Cecil Phillip and Richie Rump. We dig it because you'll hear everything from business insights to info on home brewing.

 

For education and tech news:

Software Engineering Radio - The Podcast for the Professional Software Developers

Software Engineering Radio is an educational podcast for professional developers. The 1 on 1 interview-style episodes cover everything from new tech and hot topics in the software industry to the philosophy behind web development frameworks. This is great for techies who want to stay on top of tech trends, and who love a deep technical dive into software engineering topics.

daniperea

Wanna Build the Next Airbnb?

Posted by daniperea Jun 20, 2017

Got a killer idea and want to code the next big industry darling in tech? Looking at what Airbnb's developers did to make their site and app so successful is a great way to get started. What do you think makes Airbnb so successful? Let us know in the comments below.

 

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1. Focus on the best experience for your user

Airbnb has a simple and delightful user experience. For travelers and backpackers on a budget, Airbnb is as easy to use as craigslist, but far better designed and without the inconsistency of a Craigslist listing. For travelers with more cash to spend, Airbnb is still easier to use than most hotel sites. This ease of use for travelers and hosts of all stripes has disrupted the staid lodging industry and raked in lots of revenue for Airbnb.

 

Focus on the best experience for your users, and let that experience inform your decisions on what features to add, while keeping in mind that too many features can easily distract.

 

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2. Do regular updates to enrich your user’s experience

Regular updates might seem obvious to developers, because it’s a key factor in a great experience. Even after its scrappy startup beginnings, Airbnb has maintained the typical startup best practice of using agile development (Google does this as well), pushing out their product as fast and as often as they can. Instead of waiting for a feature set to be finished before updating, Airbnb updates their app as soon as new features are implemented, even if the feature is behind the scenes. 

 

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3. Simplify the Payments Process

Payments can be one of the riskier parts of the sharing economy, but Airbnb made the process simple for travelers and hosts. Visitors enter their credit card number to book a stay and hosts are paid automatically after a successful stay. This removes the inconvenience of giving change for cash transactions and allows for a seamless experience that doesn’t even require a face to face transaction – perfect for travelers on the move. It’s a perfect outcome of meeting the business goals of the product while delivering user satisfaction in a simple, accessible and delightful to use interface.

 

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4. Create add-ons for customers that improve their experience and increase your revenue.

Airbnb developers have done an excellent job of weaving in add-on options that add value for their hosts and customers without going overboard and creating cluttered complex checkout process that decrease conversions. Add-ons for hosts include free professional photographs of their listing and a click-to-post-on-craigslist option. Guests can click to add “experiences” like a nearby wine tour. When you’re developing a checkout process, think beyond the final transaction and consider what will improve your customer’s experience without detouring from your conversion funnel.

 

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5. Develop a seamless omnichannel experience across web and mobile.

Airbnb’s marketplace can be accessed via their site, their iOs and Android apps, and on the Apple Watch. Registration and account creation is free and users can save their credentials once and then automatically sign in to both the app and site. No matter what channel customers are using to access Airbnb, the UX is the same, from filtering lodging options to messaging hosts to checking out.

 

Want more tips on creating a business like Airbnb? Merchant aggregation, like the Airbnb model, is powering a whole new category of commerce. A payments facilitator (PayFac) is a business that facilitates payments between merchants selling goods or services and the end user. This enables the end-user to easily pay online and the merchant (or property owner in the case of Airbnb) to get paid quickly. The sharing economy is a new generation of business, and so far it's booming. Want to get in on the action? Check out Becoming a Payment Facilitator (PayFac)