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5 Examples of a Good Mobile Flow Checkout

Blog Post created by taylortwain on Mar 12, 2019

Businesses invest a lot of resources in getting consumers to click on ads and drawing visitors to websites or mobile apps. They create amazing product displays to make people like and engage with their product catalog. They even offer irresistible discounts to finally get their products added to the shopping cart.

 

But even if these efforts are successful in attracting clicks and visitors, they don’t necessarily lead to results. A common challenge is the issue of “cart abandonment,” which means potential customers abandon a website or app once they are in the middle of the process of selecting items or paying for them. On average, an online store loses 75%-83.6% of sales to cart abandonment.

 

cart abandonment at 75%

 

Why do customers abandon their digital carts? There could be lots of reasons, of course, but poor user interface or user experience are chief among them, which are both issues that developers can help address.

 

Toward that end, here’s a list of five tips for preventing cart abandonment by improving the mobile flow checkout for their apps.

 

1. Let users check out as a guest

Thirty percent of users abandon the cart if they’re asked to register upfront. Niche players face this challenge more than the Amazons of the world. Customers don't like registering unless it is tied to a benefit (say a coupon code). Sometimes, even existing customers don’t prefer signing in. This is especially true when they forget their passwords and have to go through the password reset flow. These are key reasons why cart abandonment rates are lower with sites that allow users to check out as a guest.

 

good mobile workflow checkout as guest

While some users might like to provide information to get personalized suggestions, others might not like spending time filling out registration forms. So, always give them three options: sign up, sign in, and check out as a guest. This should not be a problem with fulfillment, as you can always add email and contact number fields in the delivery information form.

2. Make data entry a breeze

Most people avoid signing up just because they are too lazy to enter their details. Even when you allow users to check out as a guest, they will have to fill out the delivery form. So keep the forms precise and less boring. You can create a great user experience if you can fill out some of the fields in the delivery form by requesting certain permissions. For example, by requesting access to a user’s Google+ profile, you can fill out the fields like first name, last name, email, etc. Getting access to the user’s device location will help you get fields like state, city, locality, etc, automatically filled. This way, you can dramatically reduce the time your users would otherwise have to spend on a frustrating data entry process.

 

good user workflow data entry

Avoid clearing all fields if there is an error in one (or several) fields. Shoppers get frustrated with having to re-enter the whole thing. Save all the valid information and highlight the invalid information along with an error message. Additionally, display error messages clearly and avoid using generic messages like “invalid information.” The form you get while signing up for a Google account is a great example of a good user interface (UI) design. The form tells you exactly what went wrong and how it should be corrected.

 

mobile workflow how to correct fields

 

3. Make customers feel secure about payments

Not having a particular type of card or mobile wallet should not stop customers from checking out. Give them a lot of payment options. In addition, some customers are concerned about the security of their credit cards. Their fears are sometimes justified by the increasing number of cyber attacks. So always display security badges and make users feel secure about their payment. If possible, provide a delivery (COD) option for customers who don't know enough about security badges and aren’t comfortable with the online world.

4.  Keep the user focused on the checkout

One mistake that most online stores make is promoting other products on their checkout pages. This makes room for a lot of distraction. Customers tend to navigate to other pages hunting for better and better deals. They eventually end up confused looking at the myriad of options. Buyer’s dilemma sets in and results in cart abandonment.

 

You should cross-sell your products, but the checkout page is just not the right platform. Amazon recommends other products on the product page itself, but with a checkbox. This way, the user can buy the recommended products without leaving the main product page.

 

good workflow checkout

 

Keep designs simple, remove unnecessary links, and encourage a closed promo code field. Once a customer has added a product to the cart, your only goal should be getting the product checked out.

5. Avoid lengthy checkout processes

Don’t make the checkout page too long. Avoid less necessary conventional steps like asking “Are you sure about the details entered?” Break up the checkout process into multiple steps and deploy one step per page. Have a prominent progress bar to guide users through the checkout process. The load time of your site directly affects user experience. Fifty-seven percent of visitors abandon their carts if the load time exceeds three seconds. The faster your pages load, the more products you will sell.

Conclusion

Forty-nine percent of people operate their phones using one hand. So design the user interface in such a way that the user can complete the checkout process using one thumb. Make sure that the design works for tablet users as well. Enrich your app with all possible luxuries, and make the checkout flow as convenient as possible. Ensure that customer assistance is readily available. Add an iconic CTA button to call customer support. And offer useful links to FAQs so that users will not have to look for solutions across the Web when they have a problem with checkout. A good user experience is created only when you really care about the comfort of your customer.

 

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