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2018
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Join us at RSPA RetailNOW

Posted by daniperea Jul 26, 2018

retail now, rspa

 

Join Worldpay at RSPA RetailNOW 2018

August 5-8

Nashville, TN

Worldpay Booth #725

 

A team inspired to do better

Meet the team attending RetailNOW 2018 and hear how they are striving to empower your business independence.

 

 

Every year Worldpay looks forward to reconnecting with our partners, vendors and soon to be partners  ! With everything going on at the show, we wanted to make sure you don't miss out on the opportunities planned for you. 

 

Product booth demos

Explore what Worldpay is building to help our partners be independent 

  • triPOS® Connect and Verifone® VX 690 bring streamlined POS payment experiences to the table
  • triPOS Mobile for iOS and Android is built for the customer in mind
  • iQ® Launchpad puts partners in control for new merchant on-boarding and more
  • Bizshield/Insights delivers useful data for busy merchants, which is why we’ve made our data analytics tool intuitive and easy to use.

 

Worldpay speaking events

How Leading POS Resellers Implement Recurring Revenue Products & Services

  • Moderated by Jim Roddy, Worldpay
  • Monday, Aug. 6, 5:00-6:30 PM and Wednesday, Aug. 8, 8:00-9:30 AM

Our industry’s top-performing resellers regularly add new recurring revenue streams to their offering. This session will go in-depth with executives from those organizations detailing how they select, evaluate, bundle, market, sell, and service their recurring revenue products and services. We’ll discuss headaches and success stories plus practical tactics and techniques for transitioning your business to the highly profitable recurring revenue model.

 

You’ve Hired the Best, Now Develop Your Team for Success! (Building Productive Teams for the Long Term)

  • Presented by Shannon Reichart and Paul Kirk of Worldpay
  • Monday, Aug. 6, - 11:40am - 11:00am and 11:50am - 12:30pm
  • and Wednesday, Aug. 8, 8:00am - 8:40am and 8:50am - 9:30am

Let’s face it. Today’s tech-savvy workforce has options, and because of this, finding the right people for our business can be a challenge. This ranges from salespeople, administrative people, and everyone in between to keep your organization running at optimal velocity. And more importantly, keeping the right people is even more challenging!


This 40-minute session will assist with how to invest in developing your most valuable resource, your people, and demonstrate why this is so critical now more than ever before and how you can maximize your ROI in your talent development.

 

troubleshooting the eCommerce sandbox

 

Got 99 problems and access to our eCommerce sandbox is one (or all) of them?

 

First, bookmark Vantiv eCommerce Sandbox  for easy reference, then read on for the answers to 3 common Sandbox troubleshooting questions.

 

1) The url doesn’t work.

 

Make sure you’re using the correct url: https://www.testvantivcnp.com/sandbox/communicator/online.

 

We also recently expanded the sandbox to allow testing of our chargeback API. The URL to do this is: https://www.testvantivcnp.com/sandbox/services/chargebacks

 

2) Oops, you’re not in the Sandbox environment, you’re in the prelive environment.

 

How do you tell if you’re in the sandbox or the prelive environment?

This is easy-peasy. If the url has “prelive” in it, you’re in the prelive environment. If the url has sandbox in it, you’re in the sandbox environment.

 

Once you have applications working in the Sandbox, you can request access to our Pre-Live environment for additional testing. The prelive environment has scheduled maintenance on Tuesdays and Thursdays which is why you might see unresponsiveness. Please contact support at ecc@vantiv.com for prelive issues.

 

From: Is the sandbox site down? 

 

3) This still isn’t working - what can I do?


Have no fear, contact our helpful support team at sdksupport@vantiv.com.

 

The sandbox can tell you if it’s up or not. The live status can be checked at https://vantiv.github.io/sandbox/

What's the right payment API for developers?

When coding a payment solution, choosing the right payment API to help with your payment processing should never be taken lightly.  As developers, whether it's a payment integration for eCommerce, point-of-sale, mobile, Enterprise, or any combination, let's define what is a payment API.

 

choosing the right payment api for developers

Most payment applications (APIs) are transactional and involve sending and retrieving messages to and from remote systems across dedicated links or IP networks.  Payment API processes can include authorizing a payment, setting up a subscription, or initiating a bank transfer from a mobile app--to name a few of the common requests.

That's a hefty definition that comes with a stark reality for development teams.  On average, a comprehensive payment integration can take more than 6-months!  Here's why. 

 

Businesses demand a simple payment solution that can manage a variety of powerful capabilities and value-added features including analytics, account updating and reporting functionalities.  That's where a robust API is critical, allowing for the touch points between complex applications and financial business processes that grow each year as new trends and features become available to better serve the growing payment needs of your clients.  The process of managing, testing and certifying payment integrations take time.

 

So now that we've defined an API, let's dive into what type of API will you need for your merchant processing development project.

 

What are the types of APIs for payment developers?

When it comes to payments there are numerous APIs, but most fall into one of the categories described in Payment APIs Demystified - Five Common Types.

 

Once you master the mechanics of coding to an API in one of the standards listed below, the other APIs in the same family become more readily available to integrate into your payments development.  Because most payment transactions are message-oriented, protocols play a huge role in payment processing. 

 

In short, an understanding of the five types of APIs common in payment applications will move developers down the path to choosing the best payment API for coding payment processing and take you to the beginning of your payments journey.

 

  1. ISO 8583 Standard - Although better described as a protocol or message format, the ISO 8583 messages may travel from a merchant terminal or ATM, through to a merchant acquirer, through to card networks, and ultimately to card-issuing banks.  Quick Fact:  Most developers probably won’t code ISO 8583 messages directly unless they are working at a large retailer, bank, payment processor or payment gateway.
  2. SOAP XML Web Services - The Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is a W3C XML based standard that allows organizations to publish interfaces such that they are discoverable and platform agnostic.  Quick Fact:  A nice property of a SOAP API is that it is self-documenting.
  3. HTTP/S POST APIs - Developers use their own HTTP requests to send messages directly to a network endpoint.  Often referred to as HTTP APIs, it is standard practice to send traffic over an SSL/TLS encrypted HTTPS connection.  Quick Fact:  While POST APIs can support any type of payload, JSON is often preferred because it is lightweight, flexible, and easily parsed.
  4. REST APIsA Representational State Transfer is an architectural style for expressing an HTTP-based API.  Developers who understand how to code to HTTP POST APIs (above) will automatically understand RESTful APIs because the mechanics of interacting with them are the sameQuick Fact:  A RESTful API borrows from object-oriented design principles and typically provides multiple URL endpoints that correspond to objects being manipulated.
  5. SDKsSoftware Development Kits are client-side libraries that abstract and simplify coding to all of the above interfaces and are usually programming language aligned.  Quick Fact:  SDKs simplify coding, but also introduce a new source of complexity in the form of a client-side software component that their application depends on.

 

How to start with your Payment API Integration

Now that you've selected an API for your business needs, it's time to get coding.  So here are the typical processes developers need to follow to test and certify an integration. (We'll use the Express Certification Overview  as an example to explain these steps)

 

  1. Setup a free test account.
    • Visit Getting Started with Express.  For Worldpay, sign up for a free, production simulated test account.  After signup, look for an email containing hyperlinks, including the Express Interface API to help you begin integrating your hardware and/or software solution.
  2. Test Your Integration.
    • The Worldpay Integrated Payment production simulation certification environment allows developers to code, test and evaluate your integration to the Express Interface.  And remember, if you get stuck, ask our integration experts or review the documentation here on Vantiv O.N.E.
  3. Submit your RFC.
    • The RFC and Scenarios document gives our certification team your hardware and software details.  This documentation is required along with details on your company policy on securing sensitive cardholder information.
  4. Certification Testing and Review.
    • After our integration team has all the necessary documentation--your integration team will also need to complete and submit all appropriate scripts, which our certification team will review your test transactions and respond with any needed changes to your integration.
  5. Express Certification Letter.
    • Once certified, your team will receive an official Letter of Certification and you'll be directed to a Partner Manager to begin boarding live merchants.

 

For help in choosing the right payment API

There's a lot to consider.  Everything from PCI Compliance, tokenization, fraud protection, global support for multiple currencies, sandbox functionalities and what SDKs are available in multiple coding languages (including Java, .NET, PHP, Node.js, and C++). 

 

Plus you'll want the best team of payments experts ready to assist in your integration--since the sooner you complete a payment integration, the sooner you can start processing payments!

 

Are you ready?   Choosing the right payment API for payment processing is as simple as reaching out to our Worldpay team of API experts that are continually updating our  documentation.

 

Create a Vantiv O.N.E. Account

Create an account in our Developer Hub and get the latest news and payment integration tools, plus links to kick-start your payment integration.  Let's get started!

 

Learn More:  Create a Test Account Quick Links

Getting Started with Express Payment Development 

Install Requirements for triPOS Direct 

triPOS Cloud Quick Start Tutorial 

triPOS Mobile SDK Tutorial 

Getting Started with MercuryPay 

Lately, most of my consultations with software developer executives have focused on marketing – at their request, not mine. We discuss best practices in website content, SEO, content marketing, blogging, list building, inbound marketing, outbound marketing, and email marketing. To help spread the word on that last topic, I made email marketing the subject of my latest blog post on the Vantiv, now Worldpay Partner Advantage website: 8 great email marketing building blocks for the POS channel.

 

Today, we'll pull back from tactics and take a broader view of marketing thanks to the classic book The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing by Al Ries and Jack Trout. The 22 laws were published in 1993 – before most of the tactics I listed above were conceived – but they’ve held up for 25 years now. That figures because the word immutable means “unchanging over time.” An illustration of that is seen in Law #13 which says narrowly focused specialists are stronger than generalists. Ries and Trout wrote back in ’93: For example, White Castle has never changed its position. A White Castle today sells the same “frozen sliders” at unbelievably low prices. Fast forward to 2018, and White Castle is still going strong slinging sliders.

 

Here is the complete list of the laws plus some of my favorite passages from the book:

 

  1. The Law of Leadership: It’s better to be first than it is to be better. People tend to stick with what they’ve got. If you meet someone a little better than your wife or husband, it’s really not worth making the switch, what with attorneys’ fees and dividing up the house and kids.
  2. The Law of the Category: If you can’t be first in a category, set up a new category you can be first in. If you didn’t get into the prospect’s mind first, don’t give up hope. Find a new category you can be first in. It’s not as difficult as you might think. 
  3. The Law of Mind: It’s better to be first in the mind than to be first in the marketplace. If you want to make a big impression on another person, you cannot worm your way into their mind and then slowly build up a favorable opinion over a period of time. The mind doesn’t work that way. You have to blast your way into the mind. The reason you blast instead of worm is that people don’t like to change their minds.
  4. The Law of Perception: Marketing is not a battle of products, it’s a battle of perceptions. All that exists in the world of marketing are perceptions in the minds of the customer or prospect. The perception is the reality. Everything else is an illusion.
  5. The Law of Focus: The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s mind. The essence of marketing is narrowing the focus. You become stronger when you reduce the scope of your operations. You can’t stand for something if you chase after everything.
  6. The Law of Exclusivity: Two companies cannot own the same word in the prospect’s mind.
  7. The Law of the Ladder: The strategy to use depends on which rung you occupy on the ladder. While being first into the prospect’s mind ought to be your primary marketing objective, the battle isn’t lost if you fail in this endeavor. There are strategies to use for No. 2 and No. 3 brands.
  8. The Law of Duality: In the long run, every market becomes a two-horse race. The customer believes that marketing is a battle of products. It’s this kind of thinking that keeps the two brands on top: “They must be the best, they’re the leaders.”
  9. The Law of Opposite: If you’re shooting for second place, your strategy is determined by the leader. A good No. 2 can’t afford to be timid. When you give up focusing on No. 1, you make yourself vulnerable not only to the leader but to the rest of the pack.
  10. The Law of Division: Over time, a category will divide and become two or more categories.
  11. The Law of Perspective: Marketing effects take place over an extended period of time.
  12. The Law of Line Extension: There’s an irresistible pressure to extend the equity of the brand. One day a company is tightly focused on a single product that is highly profitable. The next day the same company is thinly spread over many products and is losing money. When you try to be all things to all people, you inevitably wind up in trouble.
  13. The Law of Sacrifice: You have to give up something in order to get something. The world of business is populated by big, highly diversified generalists and small, narrowly focused specialists. Typically, the generalist is weak.
  14. The Law of Attributes: For every attribute, there is an opposite, effective attribute. If you are to succeed, you must have an idea or attribute of your own to focus your efforts around.
  15. The Law of Candor: When you admit a negative, the prospect will give you a positive. This law only proves the old maxim: Honesty is the best policy.
  16. The Law of Singularity: In each situation, only one move will produce substantial results. Most often there is only one place where a competitor is vulnerable. And that place should be the focus of the entire invading force. It’s hard to find that single move if you’re hanging around headquarters and not involved in the process.
  17. The Law of Unpredictability: Unless you write your competitors’ plans, you can’t predict the future. As changes come sweeping through your category, you have to be willing to change and change quickly if you are to survive in the long term.
  18. The Law of Success: Success often leads to arrogance, and arrogance to failure. Ego is the enemy of successful marketing. Objectivity is what’s needed.
  19. The Law of Failure: Failure is to be expected and accepted. Too many companies try to fix things rather than drop things. If a company is going to operate in an ideal way, it will take teamwork and a self-sacrificing leader.
  20. The Law of Hype: The situation is often the opposite of the way it appears in the press. Real revolutions don’t arrive at high noon with marching bands and coverage on the 6 o’clock news. Real revolutions arrive unannounced in the middle of the night and kind of sneak up on you.
  21. The Law of Acceleration: Successful programs are not built on fads, they’re built on trends. Forget fads. The best, most profitable thing to ride in marketing is a long-term trend. Fad = Ninja Turtle. Trend = Barbie Doll.
  22. The Law of Resources: Without adequate funding, an idea won’t get off the ground. You’ll get further with a mediocre idea and a million dollars than a great idea alone. Spend enough; you can’t save your way to success.

 

For more On the Edge content, please visit the Vantiv Partner Advantage website.

 

Jim Roddy is a Reseller & ISV Business Advisor for Vantiv’s PaymentsEdge Advisory Services. He has been active in the POS channel since 1998, including 11 years as the President of Business Solutions Magazine, six years as a Retail Solutions Providers Association (RSPA) board member, and one term as RSPA Chairman of the Board. Jim is regularly requested to speak at industry conferences and he is the author of the book Hire Like You Just Beat Cancer.